Tag Archives: scoring

Dec. 8, 1940 – Bears beat the Redskins, 73-0, in the 8th NFL Championship Game

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The game was played at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., and broadcasted on radio by Mutual Broadcasting System, the first NFL title game broadcast nationwide. The Chicago Bears defeated the Washington Redskins, 73–0, the most one-sided victory in NFL history.

The Redskins had beat the Bears 7–3 in a regular season game three weeks earlier. After the contest, Redskins owner George Preston Marshall told reporters that the Bears were “quitters” and “cry babies” when the going got tough. As the Bears prepared for the rematch, Chicago head coach George Halas fired up his team by showing them newspaper articles of Marshall’s comments.

Less than a minute into the game, the Bears’ running back Bill Osmanski ran 68 yards to score the first touchdown. After the Redskins narrowly missed an opportunity to tie the game, the Bears clamped down and began to dominate, leaving the field at halftime with a 28-0 lead. Things only got worse for the Redskins, and by the end of the second half officials were asking Halas not to let his team kick for extra points, as they were running out of footballs after too many had been kicked into the stands.

The Bears followed their history-making win with two more consecutive championships, including a game against the New York Giants just two weeks after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. Many great football players were subsequently drafted into World War II, and Halas himself would leave in 1942 for a tour of duty in the Pacific. In 1946, after the war ended, Halas and a number of former players returned to the team, and the Bears won their fourth NFL Championship in seven years.

Dec. 3, 1956 – Wilt Chamberlain scored 52 points in his first college basketball game

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In his first varsity game, Wilt Chamberlain scored 52 points and grabbed 31 rebounds, breaking both all-time University of Kansas records in a 87–69 win against the Northwestern team of future NBA team mate Joe Ruklick.

Teammate Monte Johnson testified to his athleticism: “Wilt … had unbelievable endurance and speed … and was never tired. When he dunked, he was so fast that a lot of players got their fingers jammed [between Chamberlain’s hand and the rim].” By this time, Chamberlain had developed several offensive weapons that became his trademarks: his finger roll, his fadeaway jump shot, which he could also hit as a bank shot, his passing and his shot-blocking. Leading a talented squad of starters, including Maurice King, Gene Elstun, John Parker, Ron Lonesky and Lew Johnson, the Jayhawks went 13–1 until they lost a game 56–54 versus Oklahoma State, who held the ball the last three and a half minutes without any intention of scoring a basket, which was still possible in the days before the shot clock (introduced 1984 in the NCAA).

Nov. 27, 1966 – The Redskins beat the Giants, 72-41, in the highest-scoring game in NFL history

When the Washington Redskins and New York Giants met in Washington late in the 1966 season, neither team was headed to the playoffs. Actually, far from it as the Giants (team record: 1-8-1) were on their way to the worst season in team history just three seasons after playing for the NFL title. The Redskins (team record: 5-6) were trying to reach .500 for the first time in a decade. What ensued on this late November afternoon was not necessarily one of the best played games in professional football history, but it was a contest filled with more big plays and scoring than any other game in the history of the league.

Led by quarterback Sonny Jurgensen and his three touchdown passes, Washington’s offense accounted for seven of the ten Redskins’ touchdowns while the defense and special teams scored the remaining three. It was a game where both teams set records with 16 touchdowns and 113 total points. The game was played before the introduction of nets behind the goal post causing the loss of fourteen footballs to the stands. Thirteen of the footballs were lost due to extra points, and one was lost by Brig Owens who threw the ball into the crowd after he returned a fumble 62 yards for a score.

Nov. 19, 1966 – Pelé scored the 1,000th goal of his 13-year professional career

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This was a highly anticipated moment in Brazil. It was a major milestone in an illustrious career that included three World Cup championships. The goal, called popularly O Milésimo (The Thousandth), occurred in a match against Vasco da Gama, when Pelé scored from a penalty kick, at the Maracanã Stadium. Eighty thousand adoring fans cheered him wildly, even though Santos was the opposing team.

Must watch 3 min. video of Pele’ 1000th goal:

Pele announced his retirement in 1974 but in 1975 accepted a $7 million contract to play with The New York Cosmos. He led the Cosmos to a league championship in 1977 and did much to promote soccer in the United States. On October 1, 1977, in Giants Stadium, he played his last professional game in a Cosmos match against his old team Santos.

During his long career, Pele scored 1,282 goals in 1,363 games. In 1978, Pele was given the International Peace Award and in 1993 he was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame. Since retiring, he has acted as an international ambassador for his sport and has worked with the United Nations and UNICEF to promote peace and international reconciliation through friendly athletic competition.