Tag Archives: new york

Dec. 7, 1939 – Lou Gehrig was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Lou Gehrig was the first player to have the rule waived that required a player to be retired one year before he could be elected. At age 36, he was the second youngest player to be so honored (behind Sandy Koufax). He never had a formal induction ceremony. On July 28, 2013, he and eleven other deceased players including Rogers Hornsby received a special tribute during the Induction Ceremony, held during “Hall of Fame Induction Weekend”, July 26–29 in Cooperstown, New York.

Did You Know:
Gehrig was the first baseball player to have his uniform number retired?

Dec. 2, 1991 – Mets signed Bonilla to the highest paid contract in team sports

The New York Mets, with a flair for the dramatic and an unprecedented expenditure of cash, signed free agent Bobby Bonilla to a lucrative contract that made him (then) the highest-paid player in team sports. The deal had a guaranteed package for five years and worth $29 million ($48.2 million today). The contract had $27.5 million in base salary, as well as $1.5 million in a promotional arrangement.

Bonilla helped lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to consecutive National League East titles in 1990 and 1991. But without his fellow Pirate stars around him, his offensive production dropped. His stay in New York was also marred by a number of incidents, such as threatening sportswriter Bob Klapisch that he would “show him the Bronx” in response to his book on the 1992 Mets, “The Worst Team Money Could Buy: The Collapse Of The New York Mets.” On another occasion, he called the press box during a game to complain about an error that he was charged with. In 1992 Bonilla hit .249 as the Mets went 72 and 90. Bonilla hit 34 home runs in 1993 and the Mets went 59 and 103.

“I honestly didn’t even know who the coach was when I was coming to New York. I just wanted to win a championship; I didn’t even know who was coaching. I didn’t care. It could have been Aunt Jemima. They could have had the syrup coaching. I was coming here regardless. I just wanted to win a championship.” – Metta World Peace

Nov. 27, 1966 – The Redskins beat the Giants, 72-41, in the highest-scoring game in NFL history

When the Washington Redskins and New York Giants met in Washington late in the 1966 season, neither team was headed to the playoffs. Actually, far from it as the Giants (team record: 1-8-1) were on their way to the worst season in team history just three seasons after playing for the NFL title. The Redskins (team record: 5-6) were trying to reach .500 for the first time in a decade. What ensued on this late November afternoon was not necessarily one of the best played games in professional football history, but it was a contest filled with more big plays and scoring than any other game in the history of the league.

Led by quarterback Sonny Jurgensen and his three touchdown passes, Washington’s offense accounted for seven of the ten Redskins’ touchdowns while the defense and special teams scored the remaining three. It was a game where both teams set records with 16 touchdowns and 113 total points. The game was played before the introduction of nets behind the goal post causing the loss of fourteen footballs to the stands. Thirteen of the footballs were lost due to extra points, and one was lost by Brig Owens who threw the ball into the crowd after he returned a fumble 62 yards for a score.