Monthly Archives: November 2013

“I honestly didn’t even know who the coach was when I was coming to New York. I just wanted to win a championship; I didn’t even know who was coaching. I didn’t care. It could have been Aunt Jemima. They could have had the syrup coaching. I was coming here regardless. I just wanted to win a championship.” – Metta World Peace

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Nov. 30, 1991 – The United States won the first World Cup of women’s soccer

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The 1991 FIFA Women’s World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women’s World Cup, the world championship for women’s national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 November to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football’s international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women’s Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan.

It was won by the United States, whose captain April Heinrichs formed a forward line dubbed the “triple–edged sword” with Carin Jennings-Gabarra and Michelle Akers. Jennings was named player of the tournament while Akers-Stahl’s ten goals won the Golden Shoe. The United States beat Norway 2–1 in the final in front of a crowd of 65,000 people at Guangzhou’s Tianhe Stadium. Total attendance was 510,000, an average per match of 19,615.

Nov. 29, 1987 – Joe Montana began a streak of NFL record 22 consecutive passes

In 1987, Joe Montana of the San Francisco 49ers had 31 touchdown passes, a career high, in just 13 games. He also set an NFL record by completing twenty-two consecutive passes, passed for 3,054 yards, and had a passer rating of 102.1. Though the 49ers finished with the best record in the NFL, they lost in the NFC semi-finals to the Minnesota Vikings. A true student of the game, Montana won the NFL’s passing title in both 1987 and 1989.

Prior to the 1987 season, Bill Walsh completed a trade for Steve Young, then a quarterback with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Young went on to appear in eight regular season games for the team and finished the year with a passer rating of 120.8.

Thankful for all fans of the Athletic Poetics page.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

“Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare. They are consumed in 12 minutes. Half-times take 12 minutes. This is not coincidence.” – Erma Bombeck

Nov. 28, 1981 – Paul “Bear” Bryant won his 315th game to set a then-NCAA record

Paul “Bear” Bryant‘s Alabama Crimson Tide defeated in-state rival Auburn 28-17 for his 315th win. During his 25-year tenure as Alabama’s head coach, Bryant amassed six national championships and thirteen conference championships. Upon his retirement in 1982, he held the record for most wins as head coach in collegiate football history with 323 wins (232 of which came with the Crimson Tide). At the University of Alabama, the Paul W. Bryant Museum, Paul W. Bryant Hall, Paul W. Bryant Drive and Bryant–Denny Stadium are all named in his honor. He was also known for his trademark black and white houndstooth or gingham hat, deep voice, casually leaning up against the goal post during pre-game warmups, and frequently holding his rolled-up game plan while on the sidelines.

“His nickname was Bear. Now imagine a guy that can carry the nickname Bear.” – Joe Namath

“Even his peers in the coaching business felt in awe of him,” Joe Paterno said. “He had such charisma. He was just a giant figure.”

“He was simply the best there ever was.” – Bob Devaney (former Nebraska coach)