Monthly Archives: December 2012

“Approach the game with no preset agendas and you’ll probably come away surprised at your overall efforts.” – Phil Jackson

Dec. 30, 1954 – The 24-second shot clock was used for the first time in professional basketball

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“The game had become a stalling game,” Danny Biasone, owner of the Syracuse Nationals, said before his death in 1992. “A team would get ahead, even in the first half, and it would go into a stall. The other team would keep fouling, and it got to be a constant parade to the foul line. Boy, was it dull!

  • On November 22, 1950, the Fort Wayne Pistons edged the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18 in a game where the teams scored a total of eight baskets.
  • Three years later, 106 fouls were called and 128 free throws shot in a playoff game between Boston and Syracuse. Cousy scored 30 points from the foul line alone.
  • In 1954, Syracuse beat New York 75-69 in another playoff horror show where free throws outnumbered baskets 75-34.

Something drastic was called for, and Biasone knew what it was. “We needed a time element in our game,” he said. “Other sports had limits — in baseball you get three outs to score, in football you must make 10 yards in four downs or you lose the ball. But in basketball, if you had the lead and a good ballhandler, you could play around all night.”

Biasone’s idea was a shot clock, giving a team 24 seconds to attempt a shot or else lose possession of the ball. To deal with the matter of excessive fouling, the Board of Governors also adopted a rule limiting the number of fouls per team per quarter, with each foul became a shooting foul after the limit was reached. The two rules complemented each other perfectly.

The 24-second shot clock made an immediate impact. In 1954-55, its first season, NBA teams averaged 93.1 points, an increase of 13.6 points over the previous season. The Boston Celtics became the first team in NBA history to average more than 100 points per game for a season, and three years later, every team did it.

“Pro basketball would not have survived without a clock,” said Biasone.

Others agreed. “The adoption of the clock was the most important event in the NBA,” said Maurice Podoloff, the NBA’s president, while longtime Celtics coach and executive Red Auerbach called it “the single most important rule change in the last 50 years.”

– via nba.com

“Nobody’s a natural. You work hard to get good and then work to get better. It’s hard to stay on top.” – Paul Coffey

UFC 155 Dos Santos vs. Velasquez II

Who do you want to win the main event tonight?

Junior Dos Santos vs Cain Velasquez
Joe Lauzon vs Jim Miller
Tim Boetsch vs Constantinos Philippou
Alan Belcher vs Yushin Okami
Chris Leben vs Derek Brunson
Brad Pickett vs Eddie Wineland
Byron Bloodworth vs Erik Perez
Melvin Guillard vs Jamie Varner
Michael Johnson vs Myles Jury
Todd Duffee vs Phil de Fries
Leonard Garcia vs Max Holloway
Chris Cariaso vs John Moraga